Docker: How To Extract Image Filesystem Without Running Any Containers

A container image is a combination of layers where every layer represents some intermediary state of the final filesystem. Such a layered composition makes the building, storage, and distribution of images more efficient. But from a mere developer's standpoint, images are just root filesystems of our future containers. And we often want to explore their content accordingly - with familiar tools like ls, file, or tree. Let's try to see if we can achieve this goal using nothing but the means provided by Docker itself.

Container image to filesystem.

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How Kubernetes Reinvented Virtual Machines (in a good sense)

There are lots of posts trying to show how simple it is to get started with Kubernetes. But many of these posts use complicated Kubernetes jargon for that, so even those with some prior server-side knowledge might be bewildered. Let me try something different here. Instead of explaining one unfamiliar matter (how to run a web service in Kubernetes?) with another (you just need a manifest, with three sidecars and a bunch of gobbledygook), I'll try to reveal how Kubernetes is actually a natural development of the good old deployment techniques.

If you already know how to run services using virtual machines, hopefully, you'll see that there's not much of a difference in the end. And if you're totally new to operating services at scale, following through the evolution of the technology might help you as well with the understanding of contemporary approaches.

As usual, this article is not meant to be comprehensive. Rather it's an attempt to summarize my personal experience and how my understanding of the domain has been forming over the years.

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Cracking the Docker CLI: How to Grasp Container Management Commands

When you are new to Docker (or Podman, or nerdctl, or alike), the number of commands to study might be truly overwhelming.

Docker tries to control the complexity of its CLI by employing a neat grouping technique. The first thing you see after running docker help is a list of so-called Management Commands - umbrella entry points gathering the actual commands by their area of responsibility. But even this list is no short, and it's actually a list of lists!

The list of Docker Management Commands.

Also, historically, many commands are known through their shorter but vaguer aliases - for instance, you'd rather stumble upon docker ps than docker container list in the wild. So, the struggle is real 🤪

However, there might be a way to internalize (at least some of) the most important Docker commands without the brute-force memorization!

The goal of this article is to show how a tiny bit of understanding of the containers' nature can help you master Docker's CLI, starting from the most foundational group of commands - commands to manage containers.

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Learning Docker with Docker - Toying With DinD For Fun And Profit

Here is a little exercise to deepen your understanding of containers... through toying with them 🧸 The goal is to show that containers aren't just Linux processes, they are also Linux files!

The idea is simple - take a Linux machine equipped with the Docker daemon and run on it a bunch of well-known commands like docker create|start|exec|... keeping a close eye on the machine's filesystem and hoping for an interesting discovery or two.

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Containers 101: attach vs. exec - what's the difference?

The difference between docker (or podman, or containerd) attach and exec commands is a common source of confusion. And it's understandable - these two commands have similar arguments and, at first sight, similar behavior. However, attach and exec aren't interchangeable. They aim to cover different use cases, and the implementation of the commands also differs. But still, it might be hard to remember when to use which command.

Since I'm no fan of brute memorization, here is my recipe of how I managed to internalize the difference. Long story short, connecting the dots between the knowledge of what containers really are under the hood and these two commands helped to grasp the difference almost instantly. And like any true understanding, it freed me from relying only on my memory and gave me a chance to extrapolate the knowledge on a similar tech such as Kubernetes 😉

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