How To Publish a Port of a Running Container

The only "official" way to publish a port in Docker is the -p|--publish flag of the docker run (or docker create) command. And it's probably for good that Docker doesn't allow you to expose ports on the fly easily. Published ports are part of the container's configuration, and the modern infrastructure is supposed to be fully declarative and reproducible. Thus, if Docker encouraged (any) modification of the container's configuration at runtime, it'd definitely worsen the general reproducibility of container setups.

But what if I really need to publish that port?

For instance, I periodically get into the following trouble: there is a containerized Java monster web service that takes (tens of) minutes to start up, and I'm supposed to develop/debug it. I launch a container and go grab some coffee. But when I'm back from the coffee break, I realize that I forgot to expose port 80 (or 443, or whatever) to my host system. And the browser is on the host...

There are two (quite old) StackOverflow answers (1, 2) suggesting a bunch of solutions:

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Docker: How To Debug Distroless And Slim Containers

Slim containers are faster (less stuff to move around) and more secure (fewer places for vulnerabilities to sneak in). However, these benefits of slim containers come at a price - such containers lack (the much-needed at times) exploration and debugging tools. It might be quite challenging to tap into a container that was built from a distroless or slim base image or was minified using DockerSlim or alike. Over the years, I've learned a few tricks how to troubleshoot slim containers, and it's time for me to share.

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Kubernetes Ephemeral Containers and kubectl debug Command

Last week at KubeCon, there was a talk about Kubernetes ephemeral containers. The room was super full - some people were even standing by the doors trying to sneak in. "This must be something really great!" - thought I and decided to finally give Kubernetes ephemeral containers a try.

So, below are my findings - traditionally sprinkled with a bit of containerization theory and practice 🤓

TL;DR: Ephemeral containers are indeed great and much needed. The fastest way to get started is the kubectl debug command. However, this command might be tricky to use if you're not container-savvy.

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KiND - How I Wasted a Day Loading Local Docker Images

From time to time I use kind as a local Kubernetes playground. It's super-handy, real quick, and 100% disposable.

It just so happened that virtually all the scenarios I've been testing so far were based on publicly available images. But recently I found myself in a situation when I needed to run a pod with a container image that I've just built on my laptop.

One way of doing it would be pushing the image to a local or remote registry accessible from inside the kind Kubernetes cluster. However, kind still doesn't spin up a local registry out of the box (you can vote for the GitHub issue here) and I'm not a fan of sending stuff over the Internet without very good reasons.

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