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Service discovery in Kubernetes - combining the best of two worlds

Before jumping to any Kubernetes specifics, let's talk about the service discovery problem in general.

Service discovery problem

In the world of web service development, it's a common practice to run multiple copies of a service at the same time. Every such copy is a separate instance of the service represented by a network endpoint (i.e. some IP and port) exposing the service API. Traditionally, virtual or physical machines have been used to host such endpoints, with the shift towards containers in more recent times. Having multiple instances of the service running simultaneously increases its availability and helps to adjust the service capacity to meet the traffic demand. On the other hand, it also complicates the overall setup - before accessing the service, a client (the term client is intentionally used loosely here; oftentimes a client of some service is another service) needs to figure out the actual IP address and the port it should use. The situation becomes even more tricky if we add the ephemeral nature of instances to the equation. New instances come and existing instances go because of the non-zero failure rate, up- and downscaling, or maintenance. That's how a so-called service discovery problem arises.

Service discovery problem.

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Kubernetes Repository On Flame

When I'm diving into a new codebase, I always start from the project structure analysis. And my favorite tool is tree. However, not every project is perfectly balanced. Some files and folders tend to be more popular and contain much more code than others. Seems like yet another incarnation of the Pareto principle.

So, when the tree's capabilities aren't enough, I jump to cloc. This tool is much more powerful and can show nice textual statistics for the number of code lines and programming languages used per the whole project or per each file individually.

However, some projects are really huge and some lovely visualization would be truly helpful! And here the FlameGraph goes! What if we feed the cloc's output for the Kubernetes codebase to FlameGraph? Thanks to the author of this article for the original cloc-to-flamegraph one-liner:

git clone https://github.com/brendangregg/FlameGraph
go get -d github.com/kubernetes/kubernetes

cd $(go env GOPATH)/src/github.com/kubernetes/kubernetes

cloc --csv-delimiter="$(printf '\t')" --by-file --quiet --csv . | \
    sed '1,2d' | \
    cut -f 2,5 | \
    sed 's/\//;/g' | \
    ~/FlameGraph/flamegraph.pl \
        --width=3600 \
        --height=32 \
        --fontsize=8 \
        --countname=lines \
        --nametype=package \
    > kubernetes.html

open kubernetes.html

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