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Implementing Container Runtime Shim: First Code

Well, at this moment we already know what we need to deal with. In order to use runc from code we need to implement our shim as a daemon and this daemon has to be as long-lived as the underlying container process. In this article, we will try to develop a minimum viable runtime shim and integrate it with our experimental container manager.

The minimal shim implementation takes as its input a path to the container bundle (with the config.json) as well as the list of the predefined locations (for the container log file, container pidfile, container exit status file, etc). The shim needs to create a container by executing runc with the provided parameters and then serve the container process until its termination. The planned functionality of this shim version includes:

  • Detaching the shim from the container manager process.
  • Launching runc and handling container creation errors.
  • Reporting the status of the container creation back to the manager.
  • Streaming container's stdout and stderr to log file.
  • Tracking and reporting the exit code of the container.

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Implementing Container Runtime Shim: runc

A container runtime shim is a piece of software that resides in between a container manager (containerd, cri-o, podman) and a container runtime (runc, crun) solving the integration problem of these counterparts.

The easiest way to spot a shim is to inspect the process tree on a Linux host with a running docker container:

ps auxf output on a host running docker run -it ubuntu bash; notice containerd-shim process in between containerd and bash.

On the one hand, runtimes need shims to be able to survive managers restarts. On the other hand, shims are helping container managers to deal with the quirky behavior of runtimes. Since this article is a part of the container manager implementation series, we will try to create our own shim and then use it with the conman, an experimental container manager. Hopefully, during the development process, we will gain some extra understanding of the topic. Unsurprisingly, we will keep using runc as a container runtime.

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Kubernetes Repository On Flame

When I'm diving into a new codebase, I always start from the project structure analysis. And my favorite tool is tree. However, not every project is perfectly balanced. Some files and folders tend to be more popular and contain much more code than others. Seems like yet another incarnation of the Pareto principle.

So, when the tree's capabilities aren't enough, I jump to cloc. This tool is much more powerful and can show nice textual statistics for the number of code lines and programming languages used per the whole project or per each file individually.

However, some projects are really huge and some lovely visualization would be truly helpful! And here the FlameGraph goes! What if we feed the cloc's output for the Kubernetes codebase to FlameGraph? Thanks to the author of this article for the original cloc-to-flamegraph one-liner:

git clone https://github.com/brendangregg/FlameGraph
go get -d github.com/kubernetes/kubernetes

cd $(go env GOPATH)/src/github.com/kubernetes/kubernetes

cloc --csv-delimiter="$(printf '\t')" --by-file --quiet --csv . | \
    sed '1,2d' | \
    cut -f 2,5 | \
    sed 's/\//;/g' | \
    ~/FlameGraph/flamegraph.pl \
        --width=3600 \
        --height=32 \
        --fontsize=8 \
        --countname=lines \
        --nametype=package \
    > kubernetes.html

open kubernetes.html

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conman - [the] container manager: inception

With this article, I want to start a series about the implementation of a container manager. What the heck is a container manager? Some prominent examples would be containerd, cri-o, dockerd, and podman. People here and there keep calling them container runtimes, but I would like to reserve the term runtime for a lower-level thingy - the OCI runtime (de facto runc), and a higher-level component controlling multiple such runtime instances I'd like to call a container manager. In general, by a container manager, I mean a piece of software doing a complete container lifecycle management on a single host. In the following series, I will try to guide you myself through the challenge of the creation of yet another container manager. By no means, the implementation is going to be feature-complete, correct or safe to use. The goal is rather to prove the already proven concept. So, mostly for the sake of fun, let the show begin!

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A journey from containerization to orchestration and beyond

Containers gave birth to more advanced server-side architectures and sophisticated deployment techniques. Containers nowadays are so widespread that there is already a bunch of standard-alike specifications (1, 2, 3, 4, ...) describing different aspects of the containers universe. Of course, on the lowest level lie Linux primitives such as namespaces and cgroups. But containerization software is already so massive that it would be barely possible to implement it without its own concern separation layers. What I'm trying to achieve in this ongoing effort is to guide myself starting from the lowest layers to the topmost ones, having as much practice (code, installation, configuration, integration, etc) and, of course, fun as possible. The content of this page is going to be changing over time, reflecting my understanding of the topic.

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From Docker Container to Bootable Linux Disk Image

Well, I don't see any practical applications of the approach I'm going to describe... However, I do think that messing about with things like this is the only way to gain extra knowledge of any system internals. We are going to speak Docker and Linux here. What if we want to take a base Docker image, I mean really base, just an image made with a single line Dockerfile like FROM debian:latest, and convert it to something launchable on a real or virtual machine? In other words, can we create a disk image having exactly the same Linux userland a running container has and then boot from it? For this we would start with dumping container's root file system, luckily it's as simple as just running docker export, however, to finally accomplish the task a bunch of additional steps is needed...

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