conman - [the] Container Manager: Inception

With this article, I want to start a series about the implementation of a container manager. What the heck is a container manager? Some prominent examples would be containerd, cri-o, dockerd, and podman. People here and there keep calling them container runtimes, but I would like to reserve the term runtime for a lower-level thingy - the OCI runtime (de facto runc), and a higher-level component controlling multiple such runtime instances I'd like to call a container manager. In general, by a container manager, I mean a piece of software doing a complete container lifecycle management on a single host. In the following series, I will try to guide you myself through the challenge of the creation of yet another container manager. By no means, the implementation is going to be feature-complete, correct or safe to use. The goal is rather to prove the already proven concept. So, mostly for the sake of fun, let the show begin!

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Truly optional scalar types in protobuf3 (with Go examples)

In contrast to protobuf2 there is no way in protobuf3 to mark some fields as optional and some other fields as required. Instead, any field might be omitted leading this field to be set to its default zero-value. I believe there were many good reasons for such a design decision. However, while this behavior might be superior to the proto2's explicit distinction between required and optional fields, it also has some unfortunate implications.

Gopher + protobuf = love

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