pq - parse and query log files as time series

I often find myself staring at Nginx or Envoy access logs flooding my screens with real-time data. My only wish at such moments is to be able to aggregate these lines somehow and analyze the output at a slower pace, ideally, with some familiar and concise query language. And to my surprise, I haven't met a tool satisfying all my requirements yet. Well, I should be honest here - I haven't done thorough research. But if there would be a tool as widely known as jq for JSON, I wouldn't miss it probably.

So, here we go - my attempt to write a full-fledged parsing and query engine and master Rust at the same time. Yes, I know, it's a bad idea. But who has time for good ones?

First things first - a usage preview:

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Understanding Rust Privacy and Visibility Model

I spent the last couple of months writing code in Rust. It was probably my third or fourth attempt to write something substantial in this language. And every time my level of understanding of things deepened. I'm by no means a Rust expert so probably I'll be extremely inaccurate in the terminology here. And likely I'll get lots of technical details wrong too. But I had this epiphany moment of how the visibility and privacy model works in Rust so I can't help but think of sharing it with someone else.

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Go, HTTP handlers, panic, and deadlocks

Maybe the scenario I'm going to describe is just a silly bug no seasoned Go developer would ever make, but it is what it is.

I'm not an expert in Go but I do write code in this language from time to time. My cumulative number of LOC is probably still below 100 000 but it's definitely not just a few hundred lines of code. Go always looked like a simple language to me. But also it looked safe. Apparently, it's not as simple and safe as I've thought...

Here is a synthetic piece of code illustrating the erroneous logic I stumbled upon recently:

// main.go
package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sync"
)

func main() {
    mutex := &sync.Mutex{}

    f := func() {
        fmt.Println("In f()")

        defer func() {
            if r := recover(); r != nil {
                fmt.Println("Recovered", r)
            }
        }()

        dogs := []string{"Lucky"}

        mutex.Lock()
        fmt.Println("Last dog's name is", dogs[len(dogs)])
        mutex.Unlock()
    }

    f()

    fmt.Println("About to get a deadlock in main()")
    mutex.Lock()
}

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Writing Web Server in Python: sockets

What is a web server?

Let's start by answering the question: What is a web server?

First off, it's a server (no pun intended). A server is a process [sic] serving clients. Surprisingly or not, a server has nothing to do with hardware. It's just a regular piece of software run by an operating system. Like most other programs around, a server gets some data on its input, transforms data in accordance with some business logic, and then produces some output data. In the case of a web server, the input and output happen over the network via Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP). For a web server, the input consists of HTTP requests from its clients - web browsers, mobile applications, IoT devices, or even other web services. And the output consists of HTTP responses, oftentimes in form of HTML pages, but other formats are also supported.

Client talking to server over network

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Working with container images in Go

I've been working on adding basic images support to my experimental container manager and to my surprise, the task turned to be more complex than I initially expected. I spent some time looking for ways to manage container images directly from my application code. There is plenty of tools out there (docker, containerd, podman, buildah, cri-o, etc) providing image management capabilities. However, if you don't want to have a dependency on an external daemon running in your system, or you don't feel like shelling out for exec-ing a command-line tool from the code, the options are at best limited.

I've reviewed a bunch of the said tools focusing on the underlying means they use to deal with images and at last, I found two appealing libraries. The first one is github.com/containers/image library "[...] aimed at working in various way with containers' images and container image registries". The second one is github.com/containers/storage "[...] which aims to provide methods for storing filesystem layers, container images, and containers". The libraries are meant to be used in conjunction and form a very powerful image management tandem. But unfortunately, I could not find a sufficient amount of documentation, especially how to get started kind of it.

Without the docs the only way to learn how to use the libraries for me was to analyze the code of their dependants (most prominently - buildah and cri-o). It took me a while to forge a working example which is capable of:

  • pulling images from remote repositories;
  • storing images locally;
  • creating and mounting containers (i.e. writable instances of images).

In the rest of the article, I'll try to show how to use the libraries to perform the said task and highlight the most interesting parts of this journey.

Disclaimer: This is by no means an attempt to fully or even partially document the libraries!

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